Jewish and non jewish dating

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I don't understand how can one justify his/her people as being the light unto the nations without being religious, for unless that identity comes from G-d, anyone makes that sort of claim is absolutely the proudest of the proud.

How can someone boast about keeping the fifth commandment and breaking the forth at the same time?

What's the point of reciting Shema, if one disagrees with the content?

If we put our Jewishness before our relationship with G-d, we are not nurturing a Jewish tradition but idolizing our own authority to pick and choose whatever we prefer (which is exactly what all the nations are doing). He is our loving Father, and knows what is good for us better than we know. I thought the religion is continued through the mother. Caring more for one's parents' happiness instead of one's own is going backwards and very selfish on their part. As a Jewish couple, my husband and I have been married 66 years, so obviously we are elderly.

I am a non-Jewish, who have fallen for a Jewish man, and he had recently told me that he is torn between his faith and continuing seeing me.

We are very compatible, share similar views on several topics, enjoy each other company. I do believe in God, but it is based on my own belief systems comprised of many religions. I could not say at this point if I would convert, but I think I would live with it for the rest of my life always wondering if he resents having to leave his faith to be with someone.

Jewish day school, Jewish friends, a traditional Jewish home, Jewish holidays, Jewish ancestors, Jewish "culture", Jewish "values"...None of it means anything without commitment to Torah, the sine qua non of Judaism, which happens to explicitly forbid intermarriage (Deuteronomy 7:3).Such Jewish commitment comes mainly from parental examples of commitment to eating exclusively kosher, strictly keeping Shabbat, study of and adherence to Torah and Halacha, and general primacy of all things that make Jews different from non Jews. Ha Shem promised it, and so far He has kept His promise (3000 years). Alright, I respect your right to have these views, but this is the most ridiculous thing I have ever read.I was sitting firmly in the driver’s seat with mine, so much so that I became the leader of a Zionist youth movement, and started to mix with an idealistic new crowd. Things were getting serious, but I was ignoring the ramifications, because, you remember, I was not going to marry out.In the Talmud, Rabbi Hillel warns us that we should be careful not to judge another person until we have stood in their place. Related Article: Why Not Intermarry The Heartthrob One night I went to a party for friends who had just returned from a year in Israel. So, unbelievably, on the first date we spoke about him converting. Soon I realized that I couldn’t practically hide it from my parents any longer.

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